Location

If you are joining us in Hong Kong for the 2010 Learning Conference, you may find the delegate information pack a useful tool as you prepare for your travel. You can download this information here.

Conference Venue
Floor Plan (PDF)
Visas
Do you provide invitation or visa letters?
Transportation
Health
Language
Time
Electricity
Currency
Tipping
Social Conventions

The 2010 learning Conference will be held in Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong from 6 to 9 July.

Conference Venue
Hong Kong Institute of Education (HKIED)
10, Lo Ping Road
Tai Po, New Territories
Hong Kong
http://www.ied.edu.hk/eo/campus_map.htm
Map - Location of HKIED
How to get to HKIED

Visas
http://www.immd.gov.hk/ehtml/hkvisas.htm

Transportation
http://www.lonelyplanet.com/china/hong-kong/transport/getting-there-around

For your convenience the conference organisers will run buses from the two main hotels:
To Hong Kong Institute of Education (HKIed) at Tai Po Campus from the (6th – 9th July)
1. A bus will depart from YMCA at Salisbury Road, TST at 7.45 am
2. Another bus will depart from YMCA at Salisbury Road, TST at 8:00 am
3. A bus will depart from Royal Park Hotel Shatin at 8:15 am
4. Another bus will depart from Royal Park Hotel Shatin at 8:30 am
The buses that depart from The Hyatt Shatin are the same ones that depart from the Royal Park. Hence they will depart 10 minutes later at the The Hyatt
5. A bus will depart from Hyatt Shatin at 8.55
6. A second bus will depart from The Hyatt Shatin at 8.40
From HKIed to your accommodation (6-9 Jul)
A bus will depart at 6:00 pm to take participants to The HyattShatin Royal Park
A bus will depart at 6:00 pm to take participants to the YMCA at Salisbury Road, TST
A second bus will depart at 6:30 pm take participants to The Hyatt & Shatin Royal Park
A bus will depart at 6:30 pm to YMCA at Salisbury Road, TST

Conference Dinner
Please note that on Wednesday July 7 – 2 buses will depart from HKIed for the conference dinner at TST at 6.00 pm

Getting to Campus by Yourself
The HK Institute of Education has comprehensive details about how to get to its Tai Po Campus at this website:
http://www.ied.edu.hk/co/eng/get_to_our_campus.php
If you are catching a taxi to the institute it is always advisable to have the Chinese name of your destination as many New Territory drivers have little English and only know locations by their Chinese names. ;Here is the HKIed’s logo which will get you there (and not to Chinese University which is often the result if you say you want to go to the University!).

For more information about travel in Hong Kong

Health
http://www.lonelyplanet.com/china/hong-kong/practical-information/health#0

Language
Cantonese and English are the official languages, with Cantonese the most widely spoken. Mandarin is growing fast as a second language. English is widely spoken, especially in business circles.

Time
GMT + 8.

Electricity
220 volts AC, 50Hz.

Currency
Hong Kong dollar (HKD).

Tipping
Hong Kong isn’t particularly conscious of tipping and there is no obligation to tip, say, taxi drivers; just round the fare up or you can throw in a dollar or two more. It’s almost mandatory to tip hotel staff HK$10-20, and if you make use of the porters at the airport, HK$2-5 a suitcase is normally expected. The porters putting your bags on a push cart at Hong Kong or Kowloon Airport Express station do not expect a gratuity, though; it’s all part of the service.

Most hotels and many restaurants add a 10% service charge to the bill. Check for hidden extras before you tip; some midrange hotels charge HK$3-5 for each local call when they are actually free throughout the territory, and some restaurants consistently get the bill wrong. If using the services of a hotel porter, it’s customary to tip them at least HK$10.

Social Conventions
Handshaking is the common form of greeting. In Hong Kong, the family name comes first, so Wong Man Ying would be addressed as Mr Wong. Most entertaining takes place in restaurants rather than in private homes. Normal courtesies should be observed when visiting someone’s home. During a meal, a toast is often drunk saying Yum Sing at each course. There may be up to 12 courses served in a meal, and although it is not considered an insult to eat sparingly, a good appetite is always appreciated and it is considered cordial to taste every dish. It is customary to invite the host to a return dinner. Informal wear is acceptable. Some restaurants and social functions often warrant formal attire. Smoking is widely acceptable, but is now prohibited in most public places. Police who speak English have a red shoulder badge.

For all inquiries please email the Conference organisers, Common Ground, by clicking this link.

Hong Kong Institute of Education


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